EDM technology delivers extreme precision

Electricity and water never mix, right?

Actually, in certain manufacturing settings, the two diametrically opposed forces converge to create the perfect environment for cutting and shaping complex metal components.

The EDM – Electrical Discharge Machining – technology available for leased use at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Advanced Manufacturing Center in Huntington uses a thin metal wire (typically brass) to conduct electricity underwater to the raw material being machined. The wire doesn’t actually do the cutting but releases pulses of electricity to shape the metal. The deionized water is non-conductive, instead serving as an insulator and means for flushing away debris.

What sets the EDM apart is its unique ability to create intricate patterns and tight tolerances with extreme accuracy. How accurate? We’re talking in millionths of an inch. And EDM technology is equally effective at slicing and contouring soft elements like copper and the hardest of metals: think titanium, steel… even tungsten.

One need not be a seasoned machinist or engineer to take advantage of RCBI’s EDM technology. You supply the raw material and operator and our experienced machinists and technicians will guide you through each step of the process.

Manufacturers large and small leverage RCBI’s EDM technology to produce components ranging from custom tooling for plastic extrusion systems, spilt bushings, gear profiles, coupling devices and draft shaft splines for power transmissions – even precision parts for electric hair trimmers!

To learn more about whether RCBI’s Charmilles EDM Robofil 440 is the best option for your next metalworking project, drop us an email at or contact Brian Brown, senior manufacturing engineer & Huntington site manager, at or call 304.781.1689.

For information about the diverse line of manufacturing equipment available at RCBI, visit www.mfg.marshall.edu/industry/manufacturing-services/equipment/.

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