Engineering intern gains real-world experience at RCBI

Carson Boothe has been honing his engineering skills since he was a boy growing up in Lavalette, Wayne County.

“I’ve always been interested in engineering,” Boothe explained. “I remember as a child always building things with my brother such as a remote-controlled car from repurposed parts and a pulley system to hoist things from the first floor to the second floor of our house.”

At Wayne High School, Boothe immersed himself in competitive VEX Robotics, part of a team that built, programmed and maneuvered robots in various competitions, including the State Qualifying Tournament sponsored by the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI). His team’s efforts earned 20 awards in a single season and advanced four times to the World Robotics Competition, winning two awards.

Today, the electrical engineering major at Marshall University is gaining real-world engineering experience as an RCBI intern, assisting clients with a variety of projects, creating computer-aided designs, programming computer-controlled equipment, operating advanced technology to manufacture components, even repairing 3D printers when they malfunction.

“Some of the cooler projects I have worked on are a drone landing system for the U.S. military, an infectious disease control helmet and, my favorite: a mobile drone launching pad that wirelessly charges the drone,” Boothe said.

Along the way, Boothe has learned to operate computer-controlled mills and lathes, expanded his computer-assisted design (CAD), programming and layout skills and engaged directly with manufacturers and entrepreneurs who are taking advantage of RCBI’s advanced technology and expertise. And there’s an added bonus: “My RCBI internship gives me the opportunity to network with possible future employees,” Boothe said.

The junior expects to graduate from Marshall in fall 2024. He hopes to find employment in his field here in West Virginia. “I’m also thinking about getting my master’s degree in either computer science or electrical engineering while I work.”

Boothe is just one of several engineering students to serve paid internships with RCBI through the College of Engineering and Computer Sciences Co-Op Program. Mentored by experienced engineers and technicians,  RCBI interns provide valuable assistance on a variety of manufacturing projects.

“We’re proud to partner with Marshall’s Co-Op program to ensure that students in the engineering program have resume-building practical experience in manufacturing that better prepares them for employment,” said Derek Scarbro, RCBI deputy director.

Jan. 27, 2023

Other News

View All News

Learn to harness the power of 3D printers and lasers

The Marshall Advanced Manufacturing Center (MAMC) is launching a series of low-cost Saturday workshops to inspire more making locally and demonstrate the versatility of the technology available in its community makerspace. First up is 3D Printing Essentials on...

read more

MAMC makerspace extends hours

To better accommodate the public and encourage more creativity and making, the Marshall Advanced Manufacturing Center’s (MAMC) Maker Vault, the university’s community makerspace, is expanding hours of operation. Beginning Feb. 5, the Vault’s array of tools and...

read more

Barrel maker infuses ancient art with high-tech

MAMC lends hand with workforce needs The first thing visitors notice on entering West Virginia Great Barrel Company in Caldwell is the aroma. The sweet smell of freshly hewn wood mingles with the smoky scent of toasting and charring white oak to waft throughout the...

read more

MAMC honors machining, welding achievements

The Marshall Advanced Manufacturing Center (MAMC) recognized students in its career skills programs during a Dec. 7 ceremony in Huntington. MAMC partners with Mountwest Community & Technical College to offer its nationally recognized programs in Machinist...

read more

Makerspace now offers more laser power

The Marshall Advanced Manufacturing Center (MAMC) has supersized the laser cutting and etching capabilities of its community makerspace with the addition of a larger, more powerful and faster laser. The Boss LS1630 laser boosts cutting power from 45 watts to 105...

read more